MP Updates: Victoria

Thursday, 17 August 2017

The arguments in favour of legalising euthanasia and assisted suicide depend on jargon. Advocates try to hide the real facts.

They try to hide the fact that 'pain' is not the issue. Rather, what they want is individual autonomy. After all, if we grant one person 'individual autonomy,' how can we deny anyone else that? Answer: we can't. But advocates disguise this critical fact with emotional appeals to end 'pain and suffering'.

No one wants to see another suffer, but WHY would we promulgate suicide as an answer, when in so many other cases, we recognise it as a tragedy?

Western Australia is preparing to debate 'end-of-life choices'. More jargon covering up that what is being considered is the option to kill others rather than to care for and to help them. What begins as an 'option' for some soon becomes a 'right' to be demanded. And that same 'option' becomes a way to legally dismiss the needs of our most vulnerable citizens — by eliminating them.

This is not an exaggeration — it is the true threat that euthanasia and assisted suicide pose to our country.

Stay abreast of what is happening here and around the world. Read our highlights below, and be sure to check our Take Action page to know what you can do to fight this legislation. We can prove to our politicians that Australians can do better than euthanasia — and we will make it clear that we do not want any of this legislation anywhere in our country. Thank you!


 

Tuesday, 8 August 2017

There are always people who suffer from the unintended consequences of the legalisation of assisted suicide in places where it is permitted.

Meet Stephanie Packer.

Stephanie Packer is a mother of three, living in California. Her chemotherapy treatment was approved by her insurer, and then subsequently – and abruptly – declined after the assisted suicide legislation was passed.

Stephanie explains:

You allowing those patients to make that choice affects me negatively, and affects my fight and my ability to stay with my children. I want to carry on. I want to do everything I can to have one more second with my kids and as soon as this law was passed, and you see it where these laws are passed, patients fighting for a longer life will always be denied treatment because this will always be the cheapest option.


Friday, 4 August 2017

Today’s article in the The Australian says it all – marginal seats are in trouble over assisted suicide.

Here a just a few of the key numbers:

8% — is the number of Victorians whose primary voting intention have moved away from the major parties in marginal seats. These voters are indicating they will vote for independent and minor parties and make the outcomes of seats dependent on preferences.

26% — is the number of Victorians who change their view of assisted suicide laws once they hear that there is no consensus in medical opinion on this issue.

77% — is the number of Victorians who have serious underlying concerns about assisted suicide including the funding and availability of palliative care.

33% — is the number of Victorians against assisted suicide who will change their vote at the state election on the strength of this issue. And the numbers of faith based and multicultural voters are even higher. Read more: Victorian euthanasia laws: Right-to-die vote to play critical role in next state election – Herald Sun.


Thursday, 3 August 2017 

The Ministerial Advisory Panel report provides for a period of 10 days between a person making an initial and final request for assisted suicide, upon which a person is then able to receive their prescription for lethal drugs.

This is shorter than:


Tuesday, 1 August 2017

HOPE wants all Members of the Victorian State parliament to have the facts on assisted suicide and the impact it has on your electorates.

Here are three numbers from our recent polling that you need to be aware of:

59% — is the number of Victorians that said the lack of consensus amongst doctors and the medical associations like the AMA was the single biggest factor in informing their view on assisted suicide legislation. Read more: “Doctors warn Victoria against euthanasia move” — ABC.

61% — is the number of Victorians who want this whole process slowed down or stopped altogether. Read more: Voters 'wary of rushing euthanasia laws, don't trust MPs to get it right' — The Australian.
33% — is the number of Victorians against assisted suicide who will change their vote at the state election on the strength of this issue. And the numbers of faith based and multicultural voters are even higher. Read more: Victorian euthanasia laws: Right-to-die vote to play critical role in next state election — Herald Sun.

This poll was taken in May of this year across 1029 Victorians. Margin of error: ±3.2% at a 95% level of confidence. Representative of the Victorian adult population, by age, gender and geographic coverage. ISO-20252 standards and Australian Privacy Principles applied to this poll.